Launch Slideshow

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TCP's 2008 GreenSite Awards

TCP's 2008 GreenSite Awards

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    Precise concrete formwork and a system for recycling formwork materials helped reduce costs and increase efficiency in building the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

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    The Aldo Leopold Legacy Center is a small complex of buildings surrounding a central courtyard. This design is flexible in managing energy use based on thermal requirements, creates outdoor spaces, and reduces the buildings' scale.

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    Underground concrete pipe created earth tubes that ventilate the center with conditioned air.

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    Symphony House used recyclable Eco-Blast steel shot finish. While contaminated sand from sand-blasting must be discarded, builders can reuse steel shot.

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    C-GRID carbon fiber reinforcement resulted in a smaller carbon footprint by reducing the weight of precast panels, materials, and energy and superstructure requirements.

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    This project, winner of an Ontario Concrete Award for Sustainable Concrete Construction in 2007, will soon be the first mixed-use building in Canada to be LEED Gold certified.

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    The Country Club Road concrete home uses ICF construction to create an airtight, energy-efficient design.

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    The small squares on the kitchen floor were hand-brushed with multiple layers of onyx-colored stain to reach a deep color. Black grout and saw cuts create the look of tile.

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    Floors throughout the house are acid stained and feature custom designs.

Multifamily

The Currents Ottawa, Ontario

The Currents is an environmentally sensitive project near the Ottawa River that combines a high-rise condo with a new theater. The 21,429-square-foot building houses 10 stories of condominiums and the Great Canadian Theatre Company. Soon it will become the first mixed-use building in Canada to achieve LEED Gold status. (Final certification is pending.)

Concrete played a significant role in the design and sustainability of the $13.5 million project. Its strength and versatility allowed architects to design a 250-seat theater with open, column-free spans, which support the condo above.

With LEED Gold certification in mind, concrete producer Canada Building Materials (CBM) tested various mixes to maximize the amount of recycled content used in the project. Ultimately, the project team was able to achieve 49.55% post-industrial recycled content. This was especially difficult, as much of the structure was erected during the winter. The project earned LEED points for using regional bulk materials, including aggregates, cement, and slag.

Supplementary cementitious material played a dual role. It allowed designers to control the heat of hydration on a structural suspended slab supporting the floors of condos above the theater. Portions of the slab were up to 5 feet thick. The high percentage of post-industrial materials also contributed to the project's Innovation in Design credit.

By adding a corrosion inhibitor to the building's concrete parking deck, the project team earned a Durable Building credit. In total, the project's 6760 yards of concrete contributed to five of the project's LEED credits.