Launch Slideshow

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Terms of Treatment

Terms of Treatment

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    Distribution, sequential: Distribution method in which effluent is loaded into one trench and fills it to a predetermined level before passing through a relief line or device to the succeeding trench. The effluent does not pass through the distribution media before it enters succeeding trenches.

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    Distribution, serial: Distribution method in which effluent is loaded into one trench and fills to a predetermined level before passing through a relief line or device to the succeeding trench. Effluent passes through the distribution media before entering succeeding trenches, which may be connected to provide a single uninterrupted flow path.

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    Distribution, low pressure: (1) Application of effluent over an infiltrative surface via pressurized orifices and associated devices and parts (including pump, filters, controls, and piping). (2) Distribution via a network of small diameter laterals (typically 11/4-inch) with small orifices (typically1/8to3/16-inch) installed in a soil treatment area.CIDWT DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER GLOSSARY

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In the past decade, the onsite water treatment industry has transformed itself from a series of locally driven initiatives managed by sanitarians to an industry that is striving for a national consensus. The need for standardization has been pushed by the attention the EPA has recently been placing on upgrading the millions of privately operated onsite sources found throughout the country.

Many experts suggest that at least one out of every four new residential structures is now serviced by onsite systems. As public utilities struggle with tightening budgets and decide how to replace aging treatment facilities that are near capacity, developers are urged to adopt onsite as the only option for water treatment.

And combined with the interest that sustainable construction has in onsite treatments, the number of installations should increase at an even faster rate.

Recognizing the need for a national effort, more than 25 associations and universities have come together as one voice for educational, training, and lobbying efforts.

The Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment (CIDWT), often referred to as The On-site Consortium, is quickly becoming the industry's main voice on decentralized wastewater training and research efforts. The Onsite Consortium also includes people from educational institutions, citizens groups, regulatory agencies, and private industry.