Launch Slideshow

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Terms of Treatment

Terms of Treatment

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    Distribution, sequential: Distribution method in which effluent is loaded into one trench and fills it to a predetermined level before passing through a relief line or device to the succeeding trench. The effluent does not pass through the distribution media before it enters succeeding trenches.

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    Distribution, serial: Distribution method in which effluent is loaded into one trench and fills to a predetermined level before passing through a relief line or device to the succeeding trench. Effluent passes through the distribution media before entering succeeding trenches, which may be connected to provide a single uninterrupted flow path.

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    Distribution, low pressure: (1) Application of effluent over an infiltrative surface via pressurized orifices and associated devices and parts (including pump, filters, controls, and piping). (2) Distribution via a network of small diameter laterals (typically 11/4-inch) with small orifices (typically1/8to3/16-inch) installed in a soil treatment area.CIDWT DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER GLOSSARY

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In 2005, the Onsite Consortium signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the EPA as a first step in implementing EPA's program that works cooperatively with national organizations representing septic system practitioners and the public.

The Onsite Consortium's part in this MOU is to conduct and coordinate developing educational materials conveying essential information to homeowners, university students, practitioners, and decision-makers; conduct and coordinate research addressing critical issues facing the onsite waste-water treatment industry; encourage interdisciplinary collaboration among engineers and the sciences; and promote multisector collaboration and communication among Onsite Consortium institutions, professionals, and the members of the public.

In the last two years, efforts have been focused on two important initiatives. First, they have been developing the coursework for an Installer Training Program. The hope is that the program will be accepted and duplicated across the country. The first is scheduled for Dec. 8-10 in Las Vegas.

And as part of this coursework development, the Onsite Consortium released the CIDWT Decentralized Wastewater Glossary in late 2007. The idea behind the document is to provide a foundation on which stakeholders in the decentralized wastewater treatment industry can grow. The 121-page glossary not only defines most of the commonly used terms, but it also contains an appendix that lists several of the most important engineering tables used for flow and loss calculations.

Precasters who market products in the onsite water treatment arena will benefit from the CIDWT Glosasary. It can provide an excellent training tool for new employees and be a thorough reference in developing marketing and technical materials. You can find some examples of the terms and definitions are on page 47.

To learn more about the efforts of the Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment and to download a copy of the glossary, visit www.onsiteconsortium.org.

125 Years and Still Evolving