Launch Slideshow

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TCP's 2009 Greensite Awards

TCP's 2009 Greensite Awards

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    Molin Concrete's campus lies within the Rice Creek Watershed District. As part of the project, the producer restored and enhanced an existing wetland area with native vegetation.

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    Crews used a 154-ton, self-jacking tower crane to erect structural steel, and placed most of the concrete with a 92-foot placing boom and pump. A 99-ton crane and two hydraulic booms were dedicated to onsite rebar prefab and installation.

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    The building's green features include a water-based in-floor radiant heat system with a boiler that uses waste oil from fleet vehicles.

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    The Glendale Park & Ride has been recognized for its pervious concrete, which reduces water runoff and urban heat island effect.

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    In addition to environmental benefits, pervious concrete can reduce hydroplaning by preventing water from pooling on paved surfaces.

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    The Academy's hallmark 2.5-acre “live roof,” with iconic rolling hills, provides a layer of thermal insulation for the building.

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    Concrete was economical and added green features to The Encore on 7th, an 18-story retail and residential building in downtown Pittsburgh.

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    The Primrose at Landfall is the first LEED Platinum home in Wilmington, N.C. It uses less energy and water and has a smaller carbon footprint than other homes its size.

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Residential

The Primrose at Landfall / Wilmington, N.C.

After learning about insulating concrete forms (ICFs) at a concrete technologies workshop hosted by the National Association of Home Builders, the general contractor decided its first green home would benefit from the efficient system. The result was The Primrose at Landfall, Wilmington's first LEED Platinum residence.

Working with ICFs was a first for the contractor and many subcontractors, but the obvious energy savings and structural benefits more than made up for the learning curve. The team placed 138 yards of concrete in the 2770-square-foot, single-family home.

Estimated annual cost savings for the home's energy and water needs is more than $2000. The home is expected to release 4.8 fewer tons of carbon dioxide per year than a similar size home. An innovative device called The Energy Detective (TED) monitors energy consumption around the clock. During the LEED certification process, the contractor explained that giving the homeowners real-time feedback associated with cost-savings can elicit behavioral changes that allow the home to perform to its potential. As a result, the project earned LEED points for Innovation & Design that had not previously been recognized.

The Primrose is an EPA Energy Star Home and has a HERS Index of 56. The HERS Index estimates the energy savings and costs to maintain a residence. The rating indicates it is 44% more efficient than a home built strictly to code.

Other factors aided in the LEED certification. The construction team recycled 90% of jobsite waste, protected surrounding trees and soil, and installed a low-volume underground irrigation system to capture 98% of the roof's runoff for irrigation on the lot.