An orange construction cone stands next to a pothole in the Park Slope neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York, Thursday, July 30, 2015. New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer says the city should be quicker to repair the potholes that have cost taxpayers $138 million in lawsuit settlements over the last six years. Stringer released an analysis of pothole and trip-and-fall claims and said filling potholes “remains an uphill battle.” (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Mark Lennihan An orange construction cone stands next to a pothole in the Park Slope neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York, Thursday, July 30, 2015. New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer says the city should be quicker to repair the potholes that have cost taxpayers $138 million in lawsuit settlements over the last six years. Stringer released an analysis of pothole and trip-and-fall claims and said filling potholes “remains an uphill battle.” (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Repairing the infrastructure in America would enhance competitiveness, create jobs, and help the environment. However, it is also a highly divisive issue that separates Democrats and Republicans.

While Congress recently passed a $305 billion highway bill to fund maintenance for five years, this is not nearly enough. The Atlantic's Philip K. Howard looks at what's holding up repairing infrastructure and even offers a solution:

There’s a way to break the logjam caused by a lack of needed funding and an overabundance of process. Conservatives concerned about wasteful government should agree to raise taxes to fund infrastructure if liberals agree to abandon the bureaucratic tangle that causes the waste. This deal will cut critical infrastructure costs in half, enhance America’s environmental footprint, and boost the economy.

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