A view of the Integrity Mix concrete plant Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 in Houston from the roof of a home that backs up to the facility that runs 24/7.
Michael Ciaglo A view of the Integrity Mix concrete plant Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 in Houston from the roof of a home that backs up to the facility that runs 24/7.

Since 2014, Texas has led the nation in ready-mix concrete production, with roughly 1,700 permitted batch plants. Consequently, it leads the nation in the production of some of concrete's primary ingredients: sand and gravel.

The rise in concrete batch plants in Houston can be directly attributed to the population growth. These plants play an important role by producing the ready-mix concrete used for new bridges and roads. They are all allowed to operate around-the-clock and set up shop in residential areas.

While concrete producers are happy with an increased number of plants, the residents of these towns are not too pleased.

In 2016, the city's Bureau of Pollution Control and Health Services inspected 40 concrete batch plants. More than 40 permit violations were discovered, including inadequate dust control for traffic areas and visible emissions leaving property lines.

"I don't like washing my car every day, but I have to," Pat Hunter told state environmental regulators in November. "I don't like dust coming in my house, but it does."

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