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Every year The Concrete Producer compiles its annual TCP100 list as a reference for our readers, as well as a recognition of the industry's leaders.

Methodology
We rank the TCP100 by total revenue, not just concrete sales. Our goal is to show the wide spectrum of companies involved in the industry, whether concrete represents their entire business or just a part. Producers are included by their parent companies' names.



Past TCP 100 Lists

The 2011 TCP 100: An Uphill Climb

It's no secret that from 2008 to 2010, North America's concrete production industry, like much of the economy, has been stagnant and unable to gain momentum. A cavalcade of forces has conspired and schemed to reduce concrete demand. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2010 TCP 100: Slimming Down

As many hit the gym and balance their diets for a last chance at a summer body, the concrete industry also has slimmed down. But this weight loss came without choice, thanks to the nation's worst economy since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Not surprisingly, the TCP100, The Concrete Producer's annual survey of revenue, showed 2009 was another disappointing year. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2009 TCP 100: Finding the Road to Recovery

Joe Greco Jr. sighs when asked about the state of the concrete industry. The president of Greco Bros. Ready Mix Concrete in Ozone Park, N.Y., chuckles and says in a thick New York accent, "Oh boy, oh boy. I don't know where it's headed," his friendly timbre showing only a trace of distress. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2008 TCP 100: Picture Imperfect

A painter can portray whatever he likes on a blank canvas. But businesses or whole industries do not have the luxury of starting from a clean slate. They must take what is given and make the best of it. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2007 TCP 100: Following the Money

Audax Group. Park Avenue Equity Partners. ShoreView Industries. These are some of the biggest names in today's concrete industry, but you won't find them painted on a ready-mix drum. That's because one of the world's most plentiful building materials has caught the eye of a group of people far away from dusty jobsites: private investors. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2006 TCP 100: Building on Success

The skylines of the nation's cities glisten with concrete buildings that reach to the stars. Much of the material supplied for these super-structures comes from batch plants operated by skilled technicians, and then transported to jobsites by drivers, some of whom have toiled for producers for decades. Click here to read the complete article.

The 2005 TCP 100: Batter Up

When all was said and done, many producers hit home runs. The biggest hitters comprise THE CONCRETE PRODUCER's Fourth Annual TCP 100 survey of the North American concrete industry's largest producers.The full text of this article is available as a PDF document. To download the PDF version of the article Click here.

The 2004 TCP 100: Taking Names

Cautious optimism prevailed among the TCP 100-THE CONCRETE PRODUCER's third annual survey of North America's top producers, ranked by 2003 revenue. The full text of this article is available as a PDF document. To download the PDF version of the article Click here.

The 2003 TCP 100: Construction Pours it On

In 2002 the fear of the unknown seized the nation. Iraq was on many minds and a military buildup siphoned government funds from transportation and construction. A general reluctance to commit to large projects slowed many aspects of construction. Despite these factors, the 2003 TCP 100 report showed that there was still strength in concrete amid uncertain times. The full text of this article is available as a PDF document. To download the PDF version of the article Click here.