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A portion of the 24-inch-thick runways from Stapleton International Airport sits in a heap after Recycled Materials Co. Inc. demolished it as part of a demolition project

The developer, Heritage Fields, asked RMCI to participate in redeveloping the air station from the very beginning. The goal was to recycle all of the reclaimed materials from the runway removal into the development's new construction.

Not every producer is able to create its own demolition division to generate the concrete for recycling. But Rick Givan, president of RMCI, says this gives him greater control of the quality and cleanliness of the recycled aggregate the company produces.

“Typically, the material reclaimed from these projects is used as fill and base materials,” says Givan. “Performing the additional engineering and production steps to produce usable coarse specification aggregate affords the best and highest use applications that benefit the owners, the community, and the recycler.”

Keeping the material onsite kept it off of the highways. The impact of heavy trucks on California's roads persuaded the state to take a hard line. By using recycled concrete, the developer and owner don't face material disposal fees, transport costs, and the cost for new aggregate to be transported to the site.

“The business is increasingly driven by transportation costs,” Givan says. “It's getting harder and harder to afford putting trucks on the road.”

From the producer's perspective, “these urban quarries can be priced to be competitive with actual virgin reserve quarries that are moving farther and farther away from urban centers as local resources become increasingly depleted,” Givan says.

Equipment at the site includes a specialized piece of breaker equipment that makes initial cracks in the concrete runways, which are 24-inches thick in places.

The recycling plants include a Startrack impact recycler from Retek as the primary and on-grade mobile plant. Secondary recycling equipment includes a Startrack cone recycler and a jumbo screen. The project will consume a full range of recycled specification aggregates from 3-foot dimensional El Toro Stone to 5 or 16 different aggregate gradations.

For more information on the company, the project, or concrete recycling, visit their Web sites: www.recycleeltoro.com,www.rmci-usa.com,www.cdrecycling.org.

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