Launch Slideshow

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Concrete's Main Event

Concrete's Main Event

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    Attendees on the Hoover Dam Bypass Tour will get spectacular views of two iconic concrete structures.

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    Ritchie Bros. conducts the live CIM auction at World of Concrete each year.

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    Attendees learn about pervious concrete at Pervious Concrete Live.

Pervious Live Returns

Three topics of interest will be showcased at Pervious Concrete Live, which takes place during show hours in the Gold Lot, next to the North Hall.

Quality control testing

Students from the Concrete Industry Management program will explain how to use ASTM methods on both hardened and fresh pervious concrete to improve quality.

Construction details demonstration

Designers and contractors are employing new details to ensure the proper evacuation of surfaces without clogging of the outfall areas. To highlight some of the best practices of this important detail, members of the National Pervious Concrete Pavement Association will construct several types of outfalls that have been used successfully throughout the nation. These examples will be constructed in a 20x20-foot area. Some will be constructed before the show, but others will be placed during the week.

Maintenance procedures

With the amount of pervious pavement growing each year, contractors will need to learn techniques and product applications to help owners properly maintain their investments. Demonstrations are currently planned to include procedures on how to vacuum pavements to help proper infiltration rates and how to repair damaged surfaces that have been exposed to either mechanical damage or sulfate attack from salt.












Seminars for Producers

World of Concrete's top-quality education program gives you cost-effective access to the newest industry developments and the best minds in the business. Working with industry experts and drawing from attendee input, World of Concrete features a program that addresses producers' concerns. In addition to the following producer-related seminars, others cover business, finance, green building, leadership and management, and safety and risk management. Click on the Education tab at the show's website for more information.


High-Performance Concrete: Key Requirements for the Concrete Team

Time: 1-4 p.m., Monday, Jan. 23

Presenter: Jack Gibbons, Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute; and William Phelan, Euclid Chemical Co.

Description: High-performance concrete is currently being successfully used for floors, slabs, and topping with minimal cracking and curling, on bridge decks, parking decks and pavements with 75-year life cycles and high strengths from four hours to 56 days. In this seminar, concrete producers will recognize the key concrete requirements for their projects using high-performance concrete. Planning, mix designs and the pre-concrete conference preparations will be covered in relation to the key project requirements. Designing a proper QA/QC program with clearly defined jobsite responsibilities and authorities such as concrete rejection and re-dosage of HRWR admixtures will also be described in detail.



Concrete Mix Design, Part I: Evaluation of Mixtures

Time: 8-11 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 24

Presenter: Ken Hover, Cornell University

Description: Will the mix design presented meet project needs? Part I of this two-part series is an overview of how the cement, water, and aggregates interact in a concrete mix. Emphasis is on understanding reality, not on theory. Attendees will follow a mix design through the submittal process and learn how to review a proposed mix for yield, expected strength and durability, shrinkage, workability, and cost. This session highlights valuable information for anyone who may use, produce, place, finish, specify, or approve concrete mixtures or deal with complaints of cracking. Investigating aggregate gradation effects and admixtures will be covered in Part II.



Concrete Mix Design Part II: Adjusting with Aggregates and Admixtures

Time: 8-11 a.m., Wednesday, Jan. 25

Presenter: Ken Hover, Cornell University

Description: Part II of the Concrete Mix Design series continues from Part I and will focus on how aggregate size and gradation, water reducers, superplasticizers, fly ash, microsilica, and slag affect concrete's properties. Attendees will learn how to properly apply aggregate moisture corrections and will gain insight into the quality control provisions of the ACI 318 Building Code. Valuable specification compliance checklists and adjustment worksheets will be discussed and analyzed. This session highlights valuable information for anyone who may use, produce, place, finish, specify, or approve concrete mixtures or deal with complaints of cracking.



Concrete Material Incompatibility-Evaluation, Resolution, and Related Training

Time: 8-11 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 26

Presenter: Tim Cost, Holcim (U.S.) Inc.

Description: The effects of incompatibility of materials can include severely delayed or erratic set, slump loss, very poor early strength development, and associated finishing and cracking issues. This elusive behavior occurs more frequently today, influenced by cement chemistry and aggressive use of chemical admixtures and SCMs, but can be diagnosed and the causes explored through relatively simple “thermal profile” testing. The seminar will review incompatibility influences, testing equipment, and methods used to evaluate them, and mix design modifications needed for resolution or avoidance of problems. Case histories will be discussed and recommendations made for troubleshooting, in addition to QC testing protocols that can help optimize concrete mix designs and assure predictable performance.