Launch Slideshow

A 36-foot-long precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panel is installed on the I-680 project in California. Caltrans used the panels for spot reconstruction of northbound and southbound lanes

Advances in Precast Paving

Advances in Precast Paving

  • A 36-foot-long precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panel is installed on the I-680 project in California. Caltrans used the panels for spot reconstruction of northbound and southbound lanes

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmp9012%2Etmp_tcm77-1868387.jpg

    A 36-foot-long precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panel is installed on the I-680 project in California. Caltrans used the panels for spot reconstruction of northbound and southbound lanes

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    Tinu Mishra/Caltrans District 4

    A 36-foot-long precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panel is installed on the I-680 project in California. Caltrans used the panels for spot reconstruction of northbound and southbound lanes

  • In Delaware, contractors worked overnight to reconstruct Route 896 with precast/prestressed concrete panels. Each night, they removed existing 12-inch concrete pavement, placed a 4-inch pervious concrete base, installed 8-inch precast panels, and post-tensioned them together so the road could be opened to traffic the next day.

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmpAA04%2Etmp_tcm77-1868411.jpg

    In Delaware, contractors worked overnight to reconstruct Route 896 with precast/prestressed concrete panels. Each night, they removed existing 12-inch concrete pavement, placed a 4-inch pervious concrete base, installed 8-inch precast panels, and post-tensioned them together so the road could be opened to traffic the next day.

    600

    Transtec Group

    In Delaware, contractors worked overnight to reconstruct Route 896 with precast/prestressed concrete panels. Each night, they removed existing 12-inch concrete pavement, placed a 4-inch pervious concrete base, installed 8-inch precast panels, and post-tensioned them together so the road could be opened to traffic the next day.

  • Precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were used to reconstruct a section of Interstate 66 in Northern Virginia that carries more than 180,000 vehicles a day. Construction was limited to 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each night to keep the road open to daytime traffic.

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmpB7E1%2Etmp_tcm77-1868427.jpg

    Precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were used to reconstruct a section of Interstate 66 in Northern Virginia that carries more than 180,000 vehicles a day. Construction was limited to 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each night to keep the road open to daytime traffic.

    600

    Transtec Group

    Precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were used to reconstruct a section of Interstate 66 in Northern Virginia that carries more than 180,000 vehicles a day. Construction was limited to 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each night to keep the road open to daytime traffic.

  • I-680 in California is open to traffic after precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were installed the previous night.

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmp99C6%2Etmp_tcm77-1868395.jpg

    I-680 in California is open to traffic after precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were installed the previous night.

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    Transtec Group

    I-680 in California is open to traffic after precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) panels were installed the previous night.

  • Jointed precast pavement systems (JPPS) panels are interconnected similarly to cast-in-place pavement using dowels. The panels are typically heavily reinforced or pretensioned.

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmpA291%2Etmp_tcm77-1868403.jpg

    Jointed precast pavement systems (JPPS) panels are interconnected similarly to cast-in-place pavement using dowels. The panels are typically heavily reinforced or pretensioned.

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    Transtec Group

    Jointed precast pavement systems (JPPS) panels are interconnected similarly to cast-in-place pavement using dowels. The panels are typically heavily reinforced or pretensioned.

  • Precast pavement applications are gaining international popularity. This 22-mile precast/prestressed concrete toll road in Indonesia was completed in 2011.

    http://www.theconcreteproducer.com/Images/tmpB158%2Etmp_tcm77-1868419.jpg

    Precast pavement applications are gaining international popularity. This 22-mile precast/prestressed concrete toll road in Indonesia was completed in 2011.

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    Tommy Nantung/Indiana DOT

    Precast pavement applications are gaining international popularity. This 22-mile precast/prestressed concrete toll road in Indonesia was completed in 2011.

In the October 2007 issue of TCP, “Paving the Way” presented an emerging market for precast concrete: highway pavement. Several precast/prestressed concrete pavement demonstration projects had been completed throughout the U.S. Today, precast pavement can safely be considered a mature technology, providing highway agencies with yet another tool to help them get in, get out, and stay out.

The increased adoption of precast pavement has been fueled by several factors. First, the success of initial demonstration projects and recent “production” projects has increased contractors’ comfort level with the technology as an alternative to other rapid construction options, such as rapid-strength concrete and asphalt.

Some of the initial precast pavement demonstration projects are now more than 10 years old and have exhibited excellent performance, proving that precast pavement is indeed a long-lasting solution. Precast producers have also embraced this technology and have taken many steps to promote and improve awareness within the industry.

Finally, with its increased use and greater awareness, the unit cost of precast pavement has sharply decreased. This makes it more competitive with other rapid construction techniques — particularly considering the long-lasting nature of the product.

Precast pavement in brief

Precast pavement is an alternative to hot-mix asphalt and cast-in-place concrete pavement. Although it can be used for new construction, its most beneficial use has been for reconstruction and rehabilitation of existing concrete pavements. This includes reconstruction of long continuous sections of pavement, as well as isolated slab repairs.

The primary advantage of precast panels is they do not require curing time in the field. The panels can essentially be installed and opened to traffic immediately, making this an ideal technology for projects where construction is limited to short (four- to eight-hour) work windows. Precast pavement is considered to be a long-term reconstruction/rehabilitation solution, and not just a temporary quick fix.

The two primary types of precast pavement used in the U.S. to date are precast/prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) and jointed precast pavement systems (JPPS). With PPCP, the panels are typically pretensioned during fabrication and post-tensioned together onsite, providing a continuous prestressed pavement slab.

With JPPS, the panels are interconnected similarly to cast-in-place pavement using dowels. JPPS panels are typically either heavily reinforced or pretensioned.