Launch Slideshow

Using BIM for Complex Precast Elements

Using BIM for Complex Precast Elements

  • The $27 million residence hall at Valparaiso University was completed in an aggressive 12-month timeframe, largely due to its precast concrete construction using BIM, and design-build project delivery method.

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    The $27 million residence hall at Valparaiso University was completed in an aggressive 12-month timeframe, largely due to its precast concrete construction using BIM, and design-build project delivery method.

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    Coreslab Structures

    The $27 million residence hall at Valparaiso University was completed in an aggressive 12-month timeframe, largely due to its precast concrete construction using BIM, and design-build project delivery method.
  • Coreslab Structures  of Indianapolis  produced precast elements for Valparaiso Universitys first all-suite residence hall  its only 100% precast concrete dormitory.

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    Coreslab Structures of Indianapolis produced precast elements for Valparaiso Universitys first all-suite residence hall its only 100% precast concrete dormitory.

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    Coreslab Structures

    Coreslab Structures of Indianapolis produced precast elements for Valparaiso University’s first all-suite residence hall — its only 100% precast concrete dormitory.
  • Corey Greika, Coreslabs Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president, notes an interesting trend. During the recent recession, a higher percentage of the precasters projects requiring BIM were institutional, such as the Valparaiso University job. Now that private sector construction activity has increased, the plants number of BIM projects has gone down, with the exception of large projects such as stadiums.

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    Corey Greika, Coreslabs Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president, notes an interesting trend. During the recent recession, a higher percentage of the precasters projects requiring BIM were institutional, such as the Valparaiso University job. Now that private sector construction activity has increased, the plants number of BIM projects has gone down, with the exception of large projects such as stadiums.

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    Coreslab Structures

    Corey Greika, Coreslab’s Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president, notes an interesting trend. During the recent recession, a higher percentage of the precaster’s projects requiring BIM were institutional, such as the Valparaiso University job. Now that private sector construction activity has increased, the plant’s number of BIM projects has gone down, with the exception of large projects such as stadiums.
  • Mortenson Construction was able to install decorative thin brick precast panels more quickly than a traditional brick and mortar façade, especially during harsh winter weather.

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    Mortenson Construction was able to install decorative thin brick precast panels more quickly than a traditional brick and mortar façade, especially during harsh winter weather.

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    Coreslab Structures

    Mortenson Construction was able to install decorative thin brick precast panels more quickly than a traditional brick and mortar façade, especially during harsh winter weather.
  • By using BIM to execute its precast design, Mortenson Construction assures higher quality. Structural conflicts were resolved up front and decorative exterior wall panels were more easily aligned with planned openings and joints.

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    By using BIM to execute its precast design, Mortenson Construction assures higher quality. Structural conflicts were resolved up front and decorative exterior wall panels were more easily aligned with planned openings and joints.

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    Mortenson Construction

    By using BIM to execute its precast design, Mortenson Construction assures higher quality. Structural conflicts were resolved up front and decorative exterior wall panels were more easily aligned with planned openings and joints.
  • A 3D BIM rendering helped Coreslab design precise coursing for the dormitorys brick inlay façade, without having to draw and redraw layouts for each precast panel.

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    A 3D BIM rendering helped Coreslab design precise coursing for the dormitorys brick inlay façade, without having to draw and redraw layouts for each precast panel.

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    Coreslab Structures

    A 3D BIM rendering helped Coreslab design precise coursing for the dormitory’s brick inlay façade, without having to draw and redraw layouts for each precast panel.
  • During the design phase, Coreslab Structures (Indianapolis) Inc. helped determine where critical structural elements would be located, such as shear walls, door and window openings, and spaces for bathroom units. It really helped to have the 3D model up front in BIM, so we could walk around the building and really understand its structure, says Corey Greika, precast sales manager and vice president.

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    During the design phase, Coreslab Structures (Indianapolis) Inc. helped determine where critical structural elements would be located, such as shear walls, door and window openings, and spaces for bathroom units. It really helped to have the 3D model up front in BIM, so we could walk around the building and really understand its structure, says Corey Greika, precast sales manager and vice president.

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    Coreslab Structures

    During the design phase, Coreslab Structures (Indianapolis) Inc. helped determine where critical structural elements would be located, such as shear walls, door and window openings, and spaces for bathroom units. “It really helped to have the 3D model up front in BIM, so we could ‘walk around’ the building and really understand its structure,” says Corey Greika, precast sales manager and vice president.
  • The designer planned for internal spaces large enough to allow prefab bathroom units to be inserted into each suite.

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    The designer planned for internal spaces large enough to allow prefab bathroom units to be inserted into each suite.

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    Mortenson Construction

    The designer planned for internal spaces large enough to allow prefab bathroom units to be inserted into each suite.
  • Workers hoist a precast panel from a flatbed truck at the jobsite. Mortenson estimates the project's precast design and design-build approach shaved months from the project timeline.

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    Workers hoist a precast panel from a flatbed truck at the jobsite. Mortenson estimates the project's precast design and design-build approach shaved months from the project timeline.

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    Mortenson Construction

    Workers hoist a precast panel from a flatbed truck at the jobsite. Mortenson estimates the project's precast design and design-build approach shaved months from the project timeline.
  • BIM reduces the chances for error in precast construction. Rework is easily cut in half, says Andy Frank, Mortenson construction executive.

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    BIM reduces the chances for error in precast construction. Rework is easily cut in half, says Andy Frank, Mortenson construction executive.

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    Coreslab Structures

    BIM reduces the chances for error in precast construction. “Rework is easily cut in half,” says Andy Frank, Mortenson construction executive.
  • "Speed is the main benefit of using BIM." - Corey Greika, Coreslab's Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president.

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    "Speed is the main benefit of using BIM." - Corey Greika, Coreslab's Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president.

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    Harold Lee Miller

    "Speed is the main benefit of using BIM." - Corey Greika, Coreslab's Indianapolis precast sales manager and vice president.
  • Mark Ganote and Corey Greika talk at Coreslab's plant in Indianapolis.

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    Mark Ganote and Corey Greika talk at Coreslab's plant in Indianapolis.

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    Harold Lee Miller

    Mark Ganote and Corey Greika talk at Coreslab's plant in Indianapolis.
  • N'Cho Yapi checks a precast element shortly after it is poured at Coreslab Strustrures.

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    N'Cho Yapi checks a precast element shortly after it is poured at Coreslab Strustrures.

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    Harold Lee Miller

    N'Cho Yapi checks a precast element shortly after it is poured at Coreslab Strustrures.
  • Paul Sprague smooths a surface at Corelsab's plant in Indianapolis.

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    Paul Sprague smooths a surface at Corelsab's plant in Indianapolis.

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    Harold Lee Miller

    Paul Sprague smooths a surface at Corelsab's plant in Indianapolis.
  • Precast concrete pieces in Coreslab's yard await deliverty.

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    Precast concrete pieces in Coreslab's yard await deliverty.

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    Harold Lee Mill

    Precast concrete pieces in Coreslab's yard await deliverty.
  • The Kalasatama Fiskari and Fregatti residential buildings in Finland took the prize for Teklas 2013 Best Precast Project. The BIM model includes piled foundations, detailed and reinforced concrete elements, load-bearing structures, and thermal insulation and brickwork.

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    The Kalasatama Fiskari and Fregatti residential buildings in Finland took the prize for Teklas 2013 Best Precast Project. The BIM model includes piled foundations, detailed and reinforced concrete elements, load-bearing structures, and thermal insulation and brickwork.

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    Tekla Inc.

    The Kalasatama Fiskari and Fregatti residential buildings in Finland took the prize for Tekla’s 2013 Best Precast Project. The BIM model includes piled foundations, detailed and reinforced concrete elements, load-bearing structures, and thermal insulation and brickwork.
 

Backing into BIM

Although BIM has its benefits, the technology did not come to Coreslab overnight. After several of the Ontario, Canada-based producer’s North American operations had already begun the process, the Indianapolis plant started implementing BIM in 2008, when several major customers began requiring it.

“We were cautious to a degree,” says Greika. “We wanted to help design teams evaluate precast early on, but we’ve been down the path before of investing in a certain software only to find out that our customers didn’t want to use it.” Plant management chose Autodesk’s Revit software, which many of its architecture and engineering clients use.

Greika had the benefit of consulting with Coreslab colleagues in larger operations that were further along in implementing BIM. However, he cautions, “each precast plant has to evaluate its risks and determine what makes sense. You can’t just adopt what another operation is doing, even if they’re successful.”

In its initial investment, Coreslab’s Indianapolis managers decided against a full BIM implementation. The plant uses BIM in its design phase, establishing connections and penetrations and identifying potential problem areas in a 3D model. After that, they generate shop tickets in 2D.

With several major BIM projects completed and construction activity picking up, Greika says it makes sense to carry it through the entire process, from designing to generating tickets. “The further we can take the 3D modeling, the fewer chances of introducing human error, and the more accurate we’ll be,” he says.

Although contractors and specifiers have been the most proactive in adopting BIM, Mortenson sees more precasters coming onboard. “A few years back, we were selling our suppliers on BIM,” says Frank. “Now most of the big general contractors are requiring it and we see it more as a qualifier, similar to a safety rating. If a producer doesn’t use BIM, it doesn’t qualify for the bid.”

Laying the groundwork

The precast industry is actually ahead of many others with adopting BIM in the U.S.

“Precast has set the templates and procedures that will help other products, such as masonry, adopt it more easily,” says Mark Perniconi, executive director of the Charles Pankow Foundation. “I give the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) credit for being pioneers in this effort.”

Since 2006, the foundation and PCI have funded the development of the Precast Concrete National BIM Standard (NBIMS). The Precast NBIMS group has worked to identify the scope of BIM for precast, its design requirements, and practical ways to implement it.

Much of its work has been focused on overcoming precasters’ biggest hurdle to implementation: software compatibility. The interoperability of data is key to the success of BIM for any industry, and major BIM software companies—including Nemetschek, Tekla, StructureWorks, Bentley Architecture, and Autodesk—are providing input. The goal is to allow universal communication between various BIM software programs in a neutral data exchange; the most common is called Industry Foundation Classes (IFC).

The precast standard is part of a National BIM Standard for the U.S. (NBIMS-US) being developed by the BuildingSmart Alliance, a council of the National Institute of Building Sciences. NBIMS-US is an evolving, consensus-based set of technical and practice specifications that could eventually be adopted by the construction industry.

This effort has been slow to catch on, as it attempts to encompass such a vast range of products and processes, and lacks the government support required for enforcement. Industry stakeholders seem to agree that a national standard will not be what convinces precasters to adopt BIM. “The real driver will be customer demand for BIM-driven projects,” says Roger Becker, managing director of research and development for PCI.

PCI supplements the NBIMS-US effort by supporting work on BIM data exchanges. “Over the past year, we have learned that the National BIM Standards world was not ready for a domain as large as precast concrete,” says Becker. “Mechanisms for validation of data exchanges were rudimentary, manual, and terribly time-consuming.”

This disconnect has prompted a new phase of work for PCI, funded by the Charles Pankow Foundation. Professor Chuck Eastman, the “Father of BIM,” leads a project at the Georgia Tech Digital Building Laboratory to automate the data checking process within IFC, ensuring the correct information is where it should be for different software platforms to work together. Eastman also serves as a technical advisor to Precast NBIMS.

Within BIM for precast, PCI has identified 11 key points of data exchange in which different systems must communicate. These can be within a precaster’s operation (for example, tying estimating software to robotic stations) or between project partners (from a rebar supplier’s software to the producer’s). “Precast is complicated because producers can play the role of primary contractor, subcontractor, or manufacturer on various projects,” says Perniconi.

Eastman’s group has validated one of these 11 exchanges and plans to finish the remaining 10 by the end of this year. BIM software companies can begin testing and implementing the exchanges, even as they’re being developed and tested.