Cracking and Crazing

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Buying Responsibly

Environmentally friendly products for your projects and operations. More

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Products for the Producer
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BASF adds synthetic fibers to its product portfolio

CLEVELAND, OH, June 19, 2008 - The Admixture Systems business of BASF's Construction Chemicals division today announced that it now offers the MasterFiber line of synthetic fiber reinforcement as a fully integrated component of its product offering. Moredswedbyyvzwsuaycvvzybbuc

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Readers' Choice

We present the most popular products from the past year. More

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Accommodating radiant heat in slabs

We are a ready-mixed producer in northern Wisconsin. Several contractors we supply have placed in-floor heating in garage or basement floors. Two of these floors have cracked after turning on the heat. We have been told that this may be due to thermal cracking or shocking. We would like information to pass along to contractors the proper procedures for installing these tubes. How and when should homeowners begin using the heat? More

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More on Limestone Aggregate and Warehouse Floors: A Reader Responds

As a specialist in industrial floor-hardening products, I am responding to a couple of comments in the "Troubleshooting" column from the October 2002 issue. The comments were in reference to specifying limestone as coarse aggregates in concrete floor slabs. In the last paragraph, the column suggested that a larger surface area coarse aggregate would require a lesser amount of portland cement. That may be true, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. I think you should also examine the aggregate shape. More

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Measuring Crack Width in a Concrete Surface

Our customer has asked us to help him evaluate some cracking that occurred on a recent pour of a large parking lot. We believe that the cracks are caused by dry shrinkage, but the owner is concerned that the cracks are structural in nature. We have agreed to monitor the cracks for a year or so to help calm the owner's concerns. What is the best way measure any change in the cracks' width in order to monitor the slab's performance? More

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Cause of Cracks in Hollowcore Panel Topping

We supplied 4x24-foot hollowcore slabs for a building floor that received a 2-inch-thick concrete topping placed by the concrete contractor. Part of the building was left unfinished for later use, and, when it was built out, the owner noticed a crack that was visible on the topping surface but not on the underside of the hollowcore members, which are visible from the floor below. The relatively straight crack was parallel to the longitudinal dimension of the hollowcore slab and was up to 0.06 inch in width, up to 2 inches deep, and at least 20 feet long. It ran under a partition wall that had just been built, so I couldn't get a more accurate length estimate. The owner is concerned that the crack was caused by a structural overload during the build-out process and wants assurances that the building doesn't have a structural problem. What do I tell the owner? More

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