Flooring

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Discussing Joint-Free Floor Slabs at World of Concrete

Joints in industrial floors are the single most common reason for failure. At the... More

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Position Statement on Floor Flatness Tolerances

Three additional national associations, the International Union of Bricklayers and... More

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Attractive Floor Protection

The FastFloor two-component polyaspartic coating system provides style and... More

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Flooring the Competition

Producers have always touted pre-cast concrete as a contractor-friendly building system. Often its design can eliminate extra work at the jobsite and boost safety and speed. So it's not surprising that the use of the Supranos Systems' patented precast concrete structural floor and roof system has grown steadily in Florida over the past 12 years. But support for the system has come from a surprising source: Mason contractors who work on the flooring system report substantial gains in their productivity and margins. More

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Building a Dream

Precast concrete flooring solves more than a space problem. More

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Is it the Slab's Fault?

A flooring contractor has experienced problems on four occasions over the years with his two-part polyurethane floor covering not bonding to our concrete slab-on-grade. He has said that the acid-etch process prior to installing the covering did not react very well with our slab surface, based on his observation of the amount of bubbling. He also reports a strong ammonia smell emitted from our concrete as well as a darker appearance of the concrete throughout the depth of the slab. The flooring contractor did not run vapor emission tests on any of these jobs. He was confident he had waited long enough for vapor emission to not be a problem. As the concrete supplier, I am convinced that unless you run vapor emission tests that indicate the emission is below the maximum limit for his product, you are asking for bonding problems. Supposedly the general contractor installed a vapor barrier for the slab-on-grade. The flooring contractor does not believe a hydrostatic head exists under the slab. Water was present in the failed areas. The flooring contractor is convinced that something in our concrete caused his problems. Are you aware of any other factors that we need to investigate related to this type problem? More

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More on Limestone Aggregate and Warehouse Floors: A Reader Responds

As a specialist in industrial floor-hardening products, I am responding to a couple of comments in the "Troubleshooting" column from the October 2002 issue. The comments were in reference to specifying limestone as coarse aggregates in concrete floor slabs. In the last paragraph, the column suggested that a larger surface area coarse aggregate would require a lesser amount of portland cement. That may be true, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. I think you should also examine the aggregate shape. More

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They Put Promotion in Motion
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Concrete, pH, and Flooring Failure

Five years ago we supplied the concrete for an elevated slab that was later covered with vinyl composition floor tiles. We recently got a letter from the building owner telling us that the floor tiles were coming loose and that the flooring installer had inspected the problem, measured the pH at the surface, and found that it exceeded 9. A representative from the manufacturer of the tile and tile adhesive told the installer that the high pH had eaten the adhesive away in 5 years, causing the flooring failure. The manufacturer seems to be placing the blame on our concrete. The building owner contacted us and asked how to treat the concrete so the problem wouldn't recur if the tiles were removed and replaced. What information can we give the owner? More

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Beam-and-Block Floor Construction in the UK
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